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Transforming Mobility

Transforming Mobility

GM envisions a future where we can enjoy the benefits of vehicle use—freedom, convenience and comfort—while minimizing risks such as crashes, emissions and congestion.

Over the past decade, GM has built a strong leadership position in vehicle electrification and connectivity. And along with Cruise, the self-driving company majority owned by GM, we are building a similar position in self-driving vehicles. A significant part of our vision is enabling self-driving transportation in city centers, which is why our close collaboration with Cruise in San Francisco is so exciting. Cruise thinks about AV technology not just as a service, but as a platform. Ridesharing and delivery are uses of that platform.These technologies will help us achieve our vision of zero crashes, zero emissions and zero congestion—all at the same time.

Outside of cities, it is important to understand that crashes, emissions and congestion are linked in many ways. According to the Federal Highway Administration, traffic incidents—including vehicle crashes—cause about one-quarter of all congestion in the United States. Recurring peaks in demand—most notably, daily commute periods—account for about half of all congestion. Moreover, as a function of traffic volumes, congestion grows nonlinearly. This tells us that improvements in vehicle safety and strategies for smoothing travel demand peaks, even just at the margins, can help meaningfully reduce congestion, its costs to society and associated emissions reduction from vehicles spending less time on the road. AVs will be part of the answer, potentially reducing the crashes that can bring traffic to a standstill and that cost almost 1.25 million lives annually in the U.S. That’s why AVs are potentially the most significant change that will affect modern mobility, bringing enormous societal benefits, the most visible of which may be dramatic increases in road safety.