Global Reporting Index

General Disclosures
Disclosure Number Description Reference/Response
Organizational Profile
102-1 Name of the organization Cover
102-2 Activities, brands, products, and services Corporate Profile
102-3 Location of headquarters Detroit, Michigan
102-4 Location of operations Corporate Profile; 2017 Form 10-K pages 2, 16
102-5 Ownership and legal form General Motors is a publicly held corporation incorporated in the state of Delaware. Our shares trade on the New York Stock Exchange and Toronto Stock Exchange.
102-6 Markets served Corporate Profile; 2017 Form 10-K pages 2-3
102-7 Scale of the organization Corporate Profile; 2017 Form 10-K page 46
102-8 Information on employees and other workers Measure—Talent The majority of our workforce is comprised of GM employees. There are no significant variations in employment numbers.
102-9 Supply chain Manage—Supply Chain
Measure—Supply Chain
102-10 Significant changes to the organization and its supply chain 2017 Form 10-K page 1
102-11 Precautionary Principle or approach GM does not follow the precautionary approach, but has a comprehensive risk management plan in place.
102-12 External initiatives
  • CDP
  • Business for Innovation Climate & Energy Policy (BICEP) Coalition
  • United Nations Global Compact
  • U.S. Business for Climate Action
102-13 Membership of associations We work with automotive industry groups in many countries in which we operate, including, but not limited to Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers’ Association (AAM), and the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries (FCAI) in Australia. Examples of other associations we work with include the Engine Manufacturers Association, Diesel Technology Forum, Electric Drive Transportation Association, Battery Electric Vehicle Coalition, and the Fuel Cell & Hydrogen Energy Association.
Strategy
102-14 Statement from senior decision-maker CEO Message
102-15 Key impacts, risks, and opportunities 2017 Form 10-K pages 10-16
Manage—Products
Act—Operations
Ethics and integrity
102-16 Values, principles, standards, and norms of behavior Aspirations—Governance & Ethics
102-17 Mechanisms for advice and concerns about ethics Manage—Supply Chain; Act—Governance & Ethics
Governance
102-18 Governance structure Manage—Governance & Ethics
102-19 Delegating authority Manage—Governance & Ethics
102-20 Executive-level responsibility for economic, environmental, and social topics Manage—Governance & Ethics
102-21 Consulting stakeholders on economic, environmental, and social topics Manage—Governance & Ethics
102-22 Composition of the highest governance body and its committees Measure—Governance & Ethics; GM 2018 Proxy Statement pages 7-16, 23
102-23 Chair of the highest governance body GM 2018 Proxy Statement pages 11, 21
102-24 Nominating and selecting the highest governance body GM 2018 Proxy Statement pages 9-10; General Motors Company Board of Directors Corporate Governance Guidelines pages 3-4
102-25 Conflicts of interest GM 2018 Proxy Statement pages 29-31; General Motors Company Board of Directors Corporate Governance Guidelines pages 7-9, 11
102-26 Role of highest governance body in setting purpose, values, and strategy GM 2018 Proxy Statement pages 20-21
102-27 Collective knowledge of highest governance body GM 2018 Proxy Statement page 29
102-28 Evaluating the highest governance body’s performance GM 2018 Proxy Statement page 29; General Motors Company Board of Directors Corporate Governance Guidelines page 11
102-29 Identifying and managing economic, environmental, and social impacts Manage—Governance & Ethics
102-30 Effectiveness of risk management processes Manage—Governance & Ethics; GM 2018 Proxy Statement page 27
102-31 Review of economic, environmental, and social topics GM 2018 Proxy Statement page 26
102-32 Highest governance body’s role in sustainability reporting Manage—Governance & Ethics; GM 2018 Proxy Statement page 26
102-33 Communicating critical concerns http://www.gm.com/investors/corporate-governance.html
102-34 Nature and total number of critical concerns 2018 GM Proxy Statement page 36
102-35 Remuneration policies GM 2018 Proxy Statement pages 17-19, 35-67; General Motors Company Board of Directors Corporate Governance Guidelines page 10
102-36 Process for determining remuneration GM 2018 Proxy Statement pages 17-19, 35-67; General Motors Company Board of Directors Corporate Governance Guidelines page 10
102-37 Stakeholders’ involvement in remuneration GM 2018 Proxy Statement page 17
102-38 Annual total compensation ratio GM 2018 Proxy Statement pages 35-67
102-39 Percentage increase in annual total compensation ratio GM 2018 Proxy Statement pages 35-67
Stakeholder engagement
102-40 List of stakeholder groups Stakeholder Engagement
102-41 Collective bargaining agreements 2017 Form 10-K page 8
102-42 Identifying and selecting stakeholders Stakeholder Engagement
102-43 Approach to stakeholder engagement Stakeholder Engagement
102-44 Key topics and concerns raised Stakeholder Engagement
Reporting practice
102-45 Entities included in the consolidated financial statements 2017 Form 10-K page 1
102-46 Defining report content and topic Boundaries Reporting Practices
102-47 List of material topics Reporting Practices
102-48 Restatements of information Any restatements, and reasons for such, are footnoted as part of the data presentation within the body of the report.
102-49 Changes in reporting Changes have been noted in footnotes where applicable.
102-50 Reporting period Reporting Practices
102-51 Date of most recent report Reporting Practices
102-52 Reporting cycle Reporting Practices
102-53 Contact point for questions regarding the report gm.sustainability@gm.com
102-54 Claims of reporting in accordance with the GRI Standards Reporting Practices
102-55 GRI content index Reporting Practices
102-56 External assurance Reporting Practices
Topic-Specific Standards
Disclosure Number Description Reference/Response
GRI 201: Economic Performance
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary CEO Message; Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; 2017 Form 10-K page 18
103-2 The management approach and its components CEO Message; Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; 2017 Form 10-K page 18
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach CEO Message; Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; 2017 Form 10-K page 18
201-1 Direct economic value generated and distributed 2017 Form 10-K pages 18, 46
201-2 Financial implications and other risks and opportunities due to climate change Manage—Products; Act—Operations; Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics; 2017 Form 10-K pages 5-8
201-3 Defined benefit plan obligations and other retirement plans 2017 Form 10-K pages 70-71
201-4 Financial assistance received from government GM did not receive any significant financial assistance from any government in 2017.
GRI 204: Procurement Practices
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
204-1 Proportion of spending on local suppliers Measure—Supply Chain
The term “local suppliers” refers to suppliers operating in the country where a GM plant is located.
GRI 205: Anti-corruption
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics
205-1 Operations assessed for risks related to corruption Manage—Governance & Ethics
All operations are assessed for risks related to corruption. No significant risks have been identified.
205-2 Communication and training about anti-corruption policies and procedures Act—Governance & Ethics
205-3 Confirmed incidents of corruption and actions taken Allegations of corruption/bribery are formally investigated to conclusion. The investigation results are provided to pertinent stakeholders for remediation and corrective action.
GRI 302: Energy
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
302-1 Energy consumption within the organization
Energy Consumption GJ Comment
Total fuel consumption from nonrenewable sources 2014: 37,356,179
2015: 35,297,119
2016: 34,444,439
2017: 30,313,931
Includes all facility fuel for process and facility heat. Does not include landfill gas.
Total fuel consumption from renewable sources 2014: 927,092
2015: 1,187,937
2016: 2,981,123
2017: 1,118,454
Includes landfill gas use and renewable electricity generated from solar and wind or purchased under a Purchase Power Agreement
Total electricity consumption 2014: 33,092,273
2015: 32,086,922
2016: 33,364,403
2017: 29,778,155
Nonrenewable electricity
Heating consumption N/A Included in total fuel consumption
Cooling consumption N/A Included in electricity
Steam consumption 2014: 4,532,758
2015: 4,663,710
2016: 4,105,376
2017: 1,610,934
Purchased steam and delivered heat, including purchased steam from renewable sources
Electricity sold 20,232  
Heating sold N/A  
Cooling sold N/A  
Steam sold N/A  
Total energy consumption 2014: 75,908,302
2015: 73,235,689
2016: 74,895,341
2017: 62,801,243
 
302-2 Energy consumption outside of the organization 1,283,882,121 GJ
This accounts for energy used in direct and indirect auto parts supply. We have also used USEEIO-LCA Standards to calculate this value. Source of conversion factors used are purchased goods and services and capital goods.
302-3 Energy intensity Operations—Measure
1.92 MWH/vehicle
This is based on the production of 8,898,697 vehicles and includes all of our energy sources. The boundary for this is within the scope of our organization.
302-4 Reduction of energy consumption 2,652,620 GJ
All types of facility energy were included in the reductions. The basis for calculation is absolute reduction from activities in 2017. Standards, methodologies and assumptions used were good engineering practices.
302-5 Reductions in energy requirements of products and services Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; CDP Report
2,764,987 GJ
Reductions in energy consumption of our products can be contributed to increased production of electric vehicles versus internal combustion engine vehicles. Rationale for this calculation includes increased efficiencies of Chevrolet Bolt EV and Volt as compared to the Chevrolet Cruze. Standards, methodologies, assumptions, and calculation tools used can be found at https://www.fueleconomy.gov
GRI 303: Water
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
303-1 Water withdrawal by source GM measures and monitors 100 percent of our major facilities water withdrawals by source using either invoices or meter data.
Withdrawal Source (M3)
Surface water
Groundwater 2,839,337
Rainwater 960
Wastewater
Municipal water supplied 36,652,919
Total 37,493,216
303-2 Water sources significantly affected by withdrawal of water No water sources were significantly affected by withdrawal of water by GM.
303-3 Water recycled and reused Reporting is based on engineering estimates and meter data.
Metric (M3)
Total volume of water recycled and reused 16,497,015
Percentage of total water withdrawal 44%
GRI 305: Emissions
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
305-1 Direct (Scope 1) GHG emissions Baseline year in 2010, which was the first full year of operation as the new General Motors Corporation, and includes all facilities under GM operational control. Calculation includes CO2, CH4, N20, HFCs, PFCs, SF6 and NF3. Reporting is based on GHG Protocol, and the source of emission factors is regulatory or IPCC Good Practice Guidelines. Recalculation of base year emissions is due to the divestiture of our European business.
  Metric tons CO2e
Gross direct GHG emissions 1,848,804
305-2 Energy indirect (Scope 2) GHG emissions Baseline year in 2010, which was the first full year of operation as the new General Motors Corporation, and includes all facilities under GM operational control. Calculation includes CO2, CH4, N20, HFCs, PFCs, SF6 and NF3. Reporting is based on GHG Protocol, and the source of emission factors is regulatory or IPCC Good Practice Guidelines. Recalculation of base year emissions is due to the divestiture of our European business.
  Metric tons CO2e
Gross location-based indirect emissions 4,572,791
Gross market-based indirect emissions 4,191,893
305-3 Other indirect (Scope 3) GHG emissions Calculation includes CO2, CH4, N20, HFCs, PFCs, SF6 and NF3. Reporting is based on GHG Protocol, and the source of emission factors is regulatory or IPCC. Base year for calculation is 2016 when Scope 3 emissions were 320,789,810 Tons CO2e. Recalculation of base year emissions is due to the divestiture of our European business.
  Metric tons CO2e
Gross other indirect emissions 286,310,319
305-4 GHG emissions intensity 0.68 metric tons CO2e/vehicle
Calculated on the basis of 8,898,697 production vehicles; includes Scope 1 and 2 emissions and all GHG gases.
305-5 Reduction of GHG emissions 255,800 metric tons CO2
Calculated using GHG Protocol on the basis of vehicle emission reduction targets since 2016; includes all GHG gases in Scope 1 and 2 emissions. We use internal project tracking tools to obtain this data.
305-6 Emissions of ozone-depleting substances (ODS) 0.5 metric tons
Calculation includes R-402A, R-22, R-141B, R-113, R-123, R-502, R-401A, R-12, R-409A. Figures represent actual emissions; if actual emission data was not available, an emission factor of 8.5 percent of the total equipment charge by refrigerant was used to estimate emissions. The 8.5 percent rate is based on the median range of leakage rates estimates provided by the IPCC Good Practice Guidelines and Uncertainty Management in National Greenhouse Gas Inventories (2000).
305-7 Nitrogen oxides (NOX), sulfur oxides (SOX) and other significant air emissions VOC emissions are composed of the following emission units: ELPO, Primer, Topcoat, Final Repair and Cleaning Solvents, which are considered the major sources of VOC emissions, such as maintenance painting, sealers, etc. These data include data from some GM JVs.
VOC (k-tons): 21.8
NOX (metric tons): 1,388
SOX (metric tons): 26
GRI 306: Effluents and Waste
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Operations; Manage—Operations; Measure—Operations; Act—Operations
306-1 Water discharge by quality and destination Typically, effluent is treated via biological or physical/chemical methods, and in some instances by both. Water quality data is based on analytical testing.
Quality of the water, including treatment method (Reported In Million m3)
Direct discharge (to surface water body) 13.1
Indirect discharge (to treatment facility) 24.2
Discharge to groundwater 0.1
306-2 Waste by type and disposal method Includes hazardous and nonhazardous waste from manufacturing operations and some nonmanufacturing and JV facilities, excluding event waste from construction, demolition and remediation. Event waste is recycled to the greatest extent possible and tracked separately. Waste figures may also include vendor tooling used to produce proprietary GM parts.
Disposal Method (in k-tons to the nearest whole number)
Reuse 139
Recycling 1,874
Composting 3
Recovery, including energy recovery 67
Incinerating (mass burn) 23
Deep well injection minimal
Landfill 322
On-site storage minimal
Other (includes microwaving, enclaves, plasma processing and other treatments) 13
306-3 Significant spills There were no significant spills in 2017.
306-4 Transport of hazardous waste 4,409 Tons Hazardous waste transported
Zero hazardous waste imported
Zero hazardous waste exported 112 Tons hazardous waste treated
0% hazardous waste shipped internationally
Waste shipments are weighed and reported directly into centralized data reporting tool (GMR2) based on actual shipment weight. In the event actual weight is not available, internal procedures are in place to estimate &/or calculate weight based on standard industry practice.

–Data provided is for US only
–Hazardous Waste is defined based on USEPA Regulation
– Data does not include remediation, construction, demolition, which is consistent with our sustainability waste reporting
–Treatment is conducted offsite and can consist of – Solidification/Stabilization, Thermal treatment, Wastewater treatment, Other waste treatment or transfer to a Waste Broker.
GRI 308: Supplier Environmental Assessment
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
308-1 New suppliers that were screened using environmental criteria 100 percent of new suppliers are screened for environmental criteria.
308-2 Negative environmental impacts in the supply chain and actions taken Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
GRI 401: Employment
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
401-1 New employee hires and employee turnover 6,673 Global Salaried Candidates Hired
4.7 percent Total Turnover Rate
4.1 percent Volunteer Turnover Rate
401-2 Benefits provided to full-time employees that are not provided to temporary or part-time employees The table below summarizes differences in GM benefits between full-time and part-time employees in areas such as health care, retirement savings, life insurance, disability coverage and wellness programs in select programs.
Country Benefits
Canada Health Care Spending Account/Wellness contribution for part-time employee is 50 percent of that of a full-time employee
China Life Insurance (death in service), Accidental Death and Dismemberment (AD&D), Termination
Egypt Medical
Greece Termination Indemnity, Long-Term Disability
Japan Life Insurance (death in service), Accidental Death and Dismemberment, Long-term Disability, Termination
Mexico None
South America None
South Korea Life Insurance (death in service), Accidental Death and Dismemberment, Long-Term Disability, Short-Term Disability, Termination
U.S. None
Vietnam Termination Indemnity
401-3 Parental leave Manage—Talent
All U.S. salaried employees receive parental leave benefits. In 2017, there were 1,192 U.S. eligible employees of whom 255 were female and 937 were male.
GRI 402: Labor/Management Relations
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
402-1 Minimum notice periods regarding operational changes Nearly all of our labor agreements call for regular meetings between top union officials and local GM management. We also have formal processes in place to notify all workers of work stoppages.
GRI 403: Occupational Health and Safety
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
403-1 Workers representation in formal joint management—worker health and safety committees 100 percent of workers under collective bargaining agreements are represented in formal joint management worker health and safety committees.
Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
403-2 Types of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and number of work-related fatalities Measure—Safety
403-3 Workers with high incidence or high risk of diseases related to their occupation GM is unaware of any diseases related to the nature of our business.
403-4 Health and safety topics covered in formal agreements with trade unions Manage—Safety
GRI 404: Training and Education
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
404-1 Average hours of training per year per employee 13.12 hours
404-2 Programs for upgrading employee skills and transition assistance programs Act—Talent
404-3 Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews 100 percent of salaried employees receive regular performance and career development reviews.
GRI 405: Diversity and Equal Opportunity
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent
405-1 Diversity of governance bodies and employees Talent—Measure; Governance—Measure
Board makeup as of June 12, 2018
Board of Directors—Gender
Male Female
6 5
Board of Directors—Age Group
Under 30 Years 30-50 Years 50+ Years
0 0 11
Board of Directors—Diversity
White African-American Latino
9 1 1
405-2 Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men Salary information is based on annual salaries for the global salaried workforce. Executive Level (base salary only): Female to Male ratio is 97.5 percent. Management Level (base salary only): Female to Male ratio is 100.5 percent. Nonmanagement Level (base salary only): Female to Male ratio is 97.7 percent.
GRI 407: Freedom of Association and Collective Bargaining
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent; Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent; Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Talent; Manage—Talent; Measure—Talent; Act—Talent; Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
407-1 Operations and suppliers in which the right to freedom of association and collective bargaining may be at risk We have not identified any GM operations or Tier I suppliers for risks of this nature.
GRI 408: Child Labor
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
408-1 Operations and suppliers at significant risk for incidents of child labor We have not identified any GM operations or Tier I suppliers for risks of this nature.
GRI 409: Forced or Compulsory Labor
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
409-1 Operations and suppliers at significant risk for incidents of forced or compulsory labor We have not identified any GM operations or Tier I suppliers for risks of this nature.
GRI 410: Security Practices
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics
410-1 Security personnel trained in human rights policies or procedures 100 percent of security personnel have completed Code of Conduct training, which includes human rights policies and procedures.
GRI 414: Supplier Social Assessment
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Supply Chain; Manage—Supply Chain; Measure—Supply Chain; Act—Supply Chain
414-1 New suppliers that were screened using social criteria 100 percent of Tier I suppliers have expectations for social criteria outlined in our purchase contract terms and conditions.
Measure—Supply Chain
414-2 Negative social impacts in the supply chain and actions taken We have not identified any Tier I suppliers for risks of this nature.
GRI 416: Customer Health and Safety
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Safety; Manage—Safety; Measure—Safety; Act—Safety; Aspirations—Personal Mobility; Manage—Personal Mobility; Measure—Personal Mobility; Act—Personal Mobility
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Safety; Manage—Safety; Measure—Safety; Act—Safety; Aspirations—Personal Mobility; Manage—Personal Mobility; Measure—Personal Mobility; Act—Personal Mobility
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Safety; Manage—Safety; Measure—Safety; Act—Safety; Aspirations—Personal Mobility; Manage—Personal Mobility; Measure—Personal Mobility; Act—Personal Mobility
416-1 Assessment of the health and safety impacts of product and service categories 100 percent of our vehicles are assessed for health and safety impacts.
416-2 Incidents of non-compliance concerning the health and safety impacts of products and services 2017 Form 10-K pages 23-24, 71-76
GRI 418: Customer Privacy
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics; Aspirations—Personal Mobility; Manage—Personal Mobility; Measure—Personal Mobility; Act—Personal Mobility
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics; Aspirations—Personal Mobility; Manage—Personal Mobility; Measure—Personal Mobility; Act—Personal Mobility
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics; Aspirations—Personal Mobility; Manage—Personal Mobility; Measure—Personal Mobility; Act—Personal Mobility
418-1 Substantiated complaints concerning breaches of customer privacy and losses of customer data GM received no material complaints during 2017.
GRI 419: Socioeconomic Compliance
103-1 Explanation of the material topic and its Boundary Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; Aspirations—Safety; Manage—Safety; Measure—Safety; Act—Safety; Aspirations—Personal Mobility; Manage—Personal Mobility; Measure—Personal Mobility; Act—Personal Mobility; Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics
103-2 The management approach and its components Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; Aspirations—Safety; Manage—Safety; Measure—Safety; Act—Safety; Aspirations—Personal Mobility; Manage—Personal Mobility; Measure—Personal Mobility; Act—Personal Mobility; Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics
103-3 Evaluation of the management approach Aspirations—Products; Manage—Products; Measure—Products; Act—Products; Aspirations—Safety; Manage—Safety; Measure—Safety; Act—Safety; Aspirations—Personal Mobility; Manage—Personal Mobility; Measure—Personal Mobility; Act—Personal Mobility; Aspirations—Governance & Ethics; Manage—Governance & Ethics; Measure—Governance & Ethics; Act—Governance & Ethics
419-1 Non-compliance with laws and regulations in the social and economic area 2017 Form 10-K pages 23-24, 71-76
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